A MUST READ for artists…<br><br>“Okay, let me hire someone who knows how to push it on YouTube or whatever the case may be. Which, everybody does this kind of thing, anyone who is treating music like a career, it’s just the information that nobody shares.”<br><br>He spent nearly $15k<br><br>”“This is very little money, in comparison to how much bigger artists spend on their music. It’s expensive to be an artist. To do it right, to do it with quality, it takes a lot out of you.” <br><br>These days, however, there’s a whole lot more to being a professional artist than album revenue, and Radamiz credits every win in his career so far to the effort he put into his debut. “I’ve been compensated in other ways. For me to be on the stage with Nas, to have people come out, you get compensated in those ways.” <br><br>“I don’t take any of these things as losses,” he explains with more confidence. “I take these things as investments.” <br><br>In myriad tangible and intangible ways, that investment is paying off. As his name’s gotten out there, Radamiz has caught the attention of some powerful tastemakers. He’s done some high-end fashion modeling and is paid to play shows.” <br><br>^^^ It takes time to push a project, branding, rebranding, pitching, revamping, trial & error, finding a targeted audience and people who see your vision. Most artists are in it for the now, not longevity, not to build and grow or build relationships. For the money, not the experience that comes from trial & error. They expect to hit a homerun right out the part… or million dollar results, fast… and on a shoestring budget. Success doesn’t work like that.

"Uncategorized", by: - September 19, 2018

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A MUST READ for artists...

“Okay, let me hire someone who knows how to push it on YouTube or whatever the case may be. Which, everybody does this kind of thing, anyone who is treating music like a career, it’s just the information that nobody shares.”

He spent nearly $15k

"“This is very little money, in comparison to how much bigger artists spend on their music. It’s expensive to be an artist. To do it right, to do it with quality, it takes a lot out of you.”

These days, however, there’s a whole lot more to being a professional artist than album revenue, and Radamiz credits every win in his career so far to the effort he put into his debut. “I’ve been compensated in other ways. For me to be on the stage with Nas, to have people come out, you get compensated in those ways.”

“I don’t take any of these things as losses,” he explains with more confidence. “I take these things as investments.”

In myriad tangible and intangible ways, that investment is paying off. As his name’s gotten out there, Radamiz has caught the attention of some powerful tastemakers. He’s done some high-end fashion modeling and is paid to play shows."

^^^ It takes time to push a project, branding, rebranding, pitching, revamping, trial & error, finding a targeted audience and people who see your vision. Most artists are in it for the now, not longevity, not to build and grow or build relationships. For the money, not the experience that comes from trial & error. They expect to hit a homerun right out the part... or million dollar results, fast... and on a shoestring budget. Success doesn't work like that.

This Is What Investing in an Album as an Indie Artist Really Looks Like

Brooklyn rapper Radamiz breaks down all of his expenses for his indie album 'Writeous'.

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